Monday, March 16, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of March 8, 2015

1. Daylight-Saving Time Is Bad for Your Relationships, Wall Street Journal
After a bad night’s sleep, studies show, we act more selfishly, become more volatile and impulsive and have a harder time dialing back our feelings.

2. Are LARCs the Solution to Nonmarital Childbearing?, Family Studies
In short, there is more to separating sex from children than preventing children—even when, like Sawhill, policy experts are seeking to prevent children as a humanitarian goal.

3. The State of Marriage in America Today, in 6 Charts and Maps, The Washington Post
The median age of first marriage today — 29 for men and 27 for women — is higher than it has been in more than a century.

4. A Report on the Instability and Economic Challenges of Black Families is Still Debated 50 Years Later, Deseret News
Wilcox said that Moynihan's agenda was quite progressive for its time and stressed not only bolstering family structure, but also strengthening employment opportunities for African-Americans, especially the men.

5. The Terrible Loneliness of Growing Up Poor in Robert Putnam’s America, The Washington Post
Putnam doesn’t dispute that we need to fix families to fix poverty. But he pairs that with the economic argument more often advanced on the left: that declining real wages and the disappearance of blue-collar jobs have undermined families. 

6. You Won't Believe How Much an Average Wedding in America Now Costs, Fortune
The price of weddings has jumped to a new all-time high, reaching an average $31,213 in 2014, new research says.

7. Getting Married Before Having Children ‘Boosts Chances of Staying Together’ – Study, The Telegraph
“The message of this research is clear. For any couple thinking of having children, their best chance of staying together in the long run is by getting married first.”  

For more, see here.  

Monday, March 2, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of February 22, 2015

1. Why Living Alone Is Dangerous to Your Health, Wall Street Journal 
Research shows that living life alone is as dangerous as smoking or obesity. And when it comes to the five most common cancers affecting men and women, being married provided a greater survival benefit than chemotherapy (the benefit was greater for men than women).

2. Knot Now: The Benefits of Marrying in Your Mid-to-Late 20s (Including More Sex!), The Washington Post
[I]f you’d like to maximize your marital happiness, your odds of having a couple of kids, and of forging common memories and family traditions, you might not want to delay marriage if the right person presents his or herself in your mid-to-late 20s.

3. How to Find Lifetime Love: 10 Secrets From Couples Married for Decades, Today
“Their view is that couples get into these grey periods after they’re married, where nothing interesting or exciting is going on and shaking it up with something adventurous is a good idea,” Pillemer said.

4. Young Adults Putting Off Marriage, Treating It As Capstone to Other Achievements, Deseret News
"What we found when we made them (assign values) was marriage was still the most important thing they anticipated being in their future," said Willoughby.

5. Family Income - Not Married Parents - More Apt to Impact Kids' Well-Being, NBC News
"Where we see the biggest changes in marriage rates and non-marital fertility isn't happening to everyone, it's mainly the disadvantaged."

6. Are All Divorces Necessary?, Family Studies
It is not a stretch to state that at least one of the partners in each of these couples would have said at the outset of our work together that they had irreconcilable differences. Yet two years after entering our project, 38 percent of couples were still married, most of them having successfully finished treatment.

7. Exploring The Metaphysics Of Love, National Public Radio
The first part says that romantic love can be characterized by its place in a social structure or framework. The second part says that biological states of human animals play out the roles currently defined by that social framework. 

For more, see here.  

Monday, February 16, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of February 8, 2015

1. Be There for a Friend’s Relationship Crisis, But Don’t Give Advice, Wall Street Journal
The most important skill for marital first responders is listening, Dr. Doherty says. . . Refrain from jumping to a conclusion, and remember: You are hearing just one side of the story.

2. How to Fight with Your Spouse Without Ruining Your Marriage, in 9 Steps, Washington Post
It’s never too late to apologize. By which I mean, when it’s obviously far too late for saying sorry to do any good at all, you still should.

3. To Fall in Love With Anyone, Do This, The New York Times
But despite all this, I’ve begun to think love is a more pliable thing than we make it out to be. Arthur Aron’s study taught me that it’s possible — simple, even — to generate trust and intimacy, the feelings love needs to thrive.

4. Taking Risks in Love, The New York Times
The second thing love requires is mindfulness — pure focus, and total engagement in the current activity. “While washing the dishes,” the Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh teaches, “one should only be washing the dishes.”

5. Falling Marriage Rates Reveal Economic Fault Lines, The New York Times
In their analysis of census and Bureau of Labor Statistics data, they concluded that if married households today equaled the numbers seen in 1980, “the growth in median income of families with children would be 44 percent higher.”

6. Does Marriage Make You Happier?, Newsweek
Children born outside of marriage are roughly five times more likely to be poor compared to their peers in married-parent homes and are at risk for other negative outcomes.

7. How to Revive the American Dream In Blue-Collar America, Real Clear Markets
This same study finds that 37 percent of the decline in men's employment since the 1970s can be linked to declining marriage rates.

For more, see here

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of January 25, 2015

1. Family Breakdown and Poverty, Education Next
Some 40 percent of children raised by single mothers are living in poverty, according to the Census Bureau, while roughly 8 percent of children raised by married parents are poor.

2. Forget ‘Gray Divorce’: Here’s How to Make Love Last, The Wall Street Journal
The romantic spark is important, but over the long term there has to be something more, and that is friendship. A core aspect of that is the ability to embrace your partner’s interests, even if you aren't initially particularly interested.

3. How Marriage Makes People Healthier, The Economist
The researchers conclude that over time, marriage seems to be adding its very own dose of good health to a relationship, something they dub the “protective effect”.

4. What Is the Divorce Rate, Anyway?, Sliding vs Deciding: The Blog of Scott Stanley
[Y]oung married adults are not divorcing at the same rate as their parents did at similar ages, so it is likely that the divorce rate will decline in the future, once the baby boomers (who were and continue to be highly divorce prone) leave the population.

5. How Many Families Would Be Left Out by Obama’s Tax Plan?, Family Studies
The problem with Obama’s plan is that it overlooks not only families who currently have a stay-at-home parent and would like to keep it that way but also the substantial share of dual-earner families who would like to have a parent at home but feel they cannot afford to do so.

6. Is It Finally Time to Put Marriage in the Dustbin?, National Fatherhood Initiative
What hasn't changed since we started collecting data on marriage rates is the ream of data on the impact on children when they grow up without their married parents that shows these children, regardless of socio-economic status, don't fare as well, on average, as children who grow up with their married parents

7. The Brangelina Effect: Are Cohabiting Parents Turning to Marriage?, The Telegraph
Gianna Lisiecki-Cunane, a Family lawyer with JMW Solicitors, said: “Just like Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, there are many couples who are influenced by their children’s wishes and decide to marry not as a rejection of cohabitation but to provide security for their families.

For more, see here

Monday, January 19, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, January 11, 2015

1. A Longtime Proponent Of Marriage Wants To Reassess The Institution’s Future, The Washington Post
“It’s striking. She’s pro-marriage,” said Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University who writes about the marriage gap, most recently in the book “Labor’s Love Lost.” “So this is like a general who’s lost several battles saying, ‘I’m not sure it’s worth continuing the war.’”

2. Should We Stop Tracking The Divorce Rate?, Las Vegas Review-Journal
“It’s not often you see in Washington academic researchers — many of who are perhaps liberal — along with socially conservative groups that use marriage data for an advocacy agenda team up,” said Cohn.

3. Hundreds Of Retirees Share Secrets To A Happy Marriage, USA Today
And they said when you "look back from the finish line over a half century or more of marriage, lifelong marriage is incredibly good. It's almost indescribable. It's such a source of joy," he says.

4. Letter From the Editor: Marriage, And When Liberals Are Wrong, The New York Times
We should also be willing to say when we think liberals don’t have a claim on the evidence — such as when they argue that education is overrated (but still send their own children to expensive colleges) or when they argue that marriage isn’t very important.

5. Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, But Science Can Help, National Public Radio
In fact, one small study found that under an MRI scanner, the brains of the heartsick can resemble the brains of those experiencing cocaine withdrawal. 

6. Married People Aren’t Just Richer And Better-educated. They’re Also Having More Babies, The Washington Post
At the same time, non-marital births to mothers in "cohabiting unions" with a partner have been increasing over the past decade, up from 41 percent in 2002 to 58 percent.

7. Why Stick With Marriage?, The National Review Online
Tell moderately educated young men and women the truth that college-educated people know and live by: It is better for you and your children to wait until you are married before you conceive a child.

For more, see here.

Monday, December 22, 2014

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of December 14, 2014

1. The Imitation of Marriage, The New York Times
To what extent can the greater stability of upper-class family life, and the habits that have made it possible, be successfully imitated further down the socioeconomic ladder?

2. Multiracial Marriage on the Rise, Brookings Institution
In 1960, before immigration levels to the United States started to rise, multiracial marriages constituted only 0.4 percent of all U.S. marriages. That figure increased to 8.4 percent in 2010 and for recent newlyweds, 15 percent.

3. Sex and Divorce: What’s the Connection?, Family Studies
Most important, multiple sex partners seem to increase the chances of divorce for working class and college-educated Americans alike. (Note here that the association between sex partners and divorce is robust even after controlling for race, ethnicity, age at first marriage, and family structure of origin).

4. Census Bureau Proposes Dropping Some Marriage and Divorce Questions, Pew Research Center
The numbers help guide the distribution of more than $416 billion in federal funds, and are widely used by government officials, businesses, researchers and advocacy groups.

5. The Author Speaks, Psychology Today
That means that negative emotions, like defensiveness and contempt, have more power to hurt a relationship than positive emotions have to help a relationship.

6. Are Gadget-Free Bedrooms the Secret to a Happy Relationship?, The New York Times
One way to find a balance, according to researchers I spoke with, is to organize device-free outings with your significant other. . . At home. . . researchers suggested setting up gadget-free zones, where laptops, iPads and other devices are banned.

7. Parenting Without Marriage [AUDIO], KERA
[Conversation with Isabel V. Sawhill, senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institute, on her new book, Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage.]

For more, see here.

Sunday, November 30, 2014

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of November 23, 2014

1. The No. 1 Cause Of Divorce May Not Be What You Think, Deseret News
[O]ur affections often grow toward our investments. Wherever we put our time, money and energy also ends up receiving our passion, interest and affection.

2. How Did Your Parents’ Divorce Affect You?, The Telegraph
Nearly one in three said one parent had tried to turn them against the other and more than a quarter said their parents tried to involve them in the dispute.

3. A Bad Marriage Can Literally Break Your Heart, Especially If You’re A Woman, The Washington Post
So while a lot of marriage counseling may focus on younger couples, the study authors emphasize that older couples would be wise to pay attention to the qualities of their marriages, too.

4. The Benefits: Evaluation Summaries of Healthy Romantic Relationship Programs for Youth, The Dibble Institute
Benefits include: Reduce teen dating violence and abuse and increase youth’s asset. . . significantly delay the onset of sexual activity. . . and decrease peer-to-peer physical violence and improve communications with parents.

5. The Biggest Reason For Income Inequality Is Single Parenthood, The American Enterprise Institute
Research by Harvard economists, Chetty et al. concludes that the single strongest correlate of upward economic mobility across geographic regions of America is the fraction of children living in single-parent families.

6. The Right and Campus Rape, National Review Online
So, in one large class at the University of Virginia, fully 39 percent of the female students report having been directly affected by forcible sexual assault. 

7. What’s Stopping Young Adults From Forming Stable Families?, Family Studies
[T]heir experiences of family fragmentation sharpen their desire to get and stay married, on the one hand, but on the other hand it also shakes their confidence in the durability of marriage. 

For more, see here.